Nerdology

Mar 19

[video]

[video]

Mar 16

Having a think about Batman. Just to be clear, I’m not disinterested in Batman / Superman. But Keaton as Batman would get me even more excited.

Having a think about Batman. Just to be clear, I’m not disinterested in Batman / Superman. But Keaton as Batman would get me even more excited.

Mar 14

[video]

Mar 13

Amazon Prime price jumping to $99 in the US -

I suspect, that this has everything to do with streaming and nothing to do with shipping. I just worry that soon we’ll hear that Amazon is paying Comcast and AT&T so their streaming goes uninterrupted, just like Netflix. And we all made that possible.

Mar 10

[video]

Mar 04

newsweek:

Newsweek’s print mag is back! Our 1st issue hits news stands on 3/7. So excited!

Seems like a step backwards, no? #longlivetheinternet

newsweek:

Newsweek’s print mag is back! Our 1st issue hits news stands on 3/7. So excited!

Seems like a step backwards, no? #longlivetheinternet

(via theatlantic)

Mar 01

[video]

Feb 25


So there’s the entire problem, expressed in four simple ideas: the internet is a utility, there is zero meaningful competition to provide that utility to Americans, all internet providers should be treated equally, and the FCC is doing a miserably ineffective job.

Read. Email. Call.

So there’s the entire problem, expressed in four simple ideas: the internet is a utility, there is zero meaningful competition to provide that utility to Americans, all internet providers should be treated equally, and the FCC is doing a miserably ineffective job.

Read. Email. Call.

The internet is fucked -

Nilay Patel explains why Netflix paying Comcast and Verizon is bad for the internet, why they feel they had to do it, and (more importantly) how we’ve gotten to this place.

Here’s a simple truth: the internet has radically changed the world. Over the course of the past 20 years, the idea of networking all the world’s computers has gone from a research science pipe dream to a necessary condition of economic and social development, from government and university labs to kitchen tables and city streets. We are all travelers now, desperate souls searching for a signal to connect us all. It is awesome.

And we’re fucking everything up.

In the meantime, the companies that control the internet have continued down a dark path, free of any oversight or meaningful competition to check their behavior. In January, AT&T announced a new “sponsored data” plan that would dramatically alter the fierce one-click-away competition that’s thus far characterized the internet. Earlier this month,Comcast announced plans to merge with Time Warner Cable, creating an internet service behemoth that will serve 40 percent of Americans in 19 of the 20 biggest markets with virtually no rivals.

And after months of declining Netflix performance on Comcast’s network, the two companies announced a new “paid peering” arrangement on Sunday, which will see Netflix pay Comcast for better access to its customers, a capitulation Netflix has been trying to avoid for years. Paid peering arrangements are common among the network companies that connect the backbones of the internet, but consumer companies like Netflix have traditionally remained out of the fray — and since there’s no oversight or transparency into the terms of the deal, it’s impossible to know what kind of precedent it sets. …

If you read one article today, it should be this one.