Nerdology (n) - a study of people and objects that make the kingdom of nerd fun and exciting. From robots and lasers to incredible Star Trek gift sets.

You can e-mail me tips or ideas: nerdology project (at) gmail (dot) com

Features
Taking 5
Round of Applause
Awful Nerd Shirts
Videogame Music Fridays
Video Features
DrawCast
Other Featured Articles


Where You Can Find Me
Facebook
Twitter
Tumblr
Vimeo
GDGT

Currently Playing
Wolfenstein The New Order
Forza 4
Two Dots
Super Time Force


Posts tagged Xbox Live

Taking 5: You Have A Headset

Like most Xbox One owners I’ve been playing a good amount of Titanfall. But something I’ve noticed more and more is silence. No one is using their headsets to talk to each other. The only audio I get during the game is the crackling of the NPC commander yelling at me. This is true in every game type I’ve played, including Hardpoint, an objective based game type.

It’s just insane to me that no one uses their headset. Especially when playing games where tactics are a huge part, you have to use your mic. With a microphone included with every Xbox One and Xbox 360 there is no excuse.

I’ve noticed this trend in the last few years on Xbox. When I was started playing games on Xbox Live (Crimson Skies and then Halo 2) people wouldn’t shut up. You always knew exactly where everyone was, who was going to take the flag and who was staying behind to defend.

It actually got to the point where there was too much conversation. Sure you’d get people would singing, and there was a ton of trash talk (I produced two videos at CollegeHumor exploring just that) but those were fringe cases and overall it was better that people were talking.

There was so much talking during Xbox games that Bungie made a point to show how easy it was to mute people in Halo 3. That’s what I want to get back to. Making shooters social again. I would much rather mute a few people talking too much (or breathing heavily into their mic) than have complete silence during the game.

I first noticed the decline of conversation playing Halo Reach Multiplayer and it was very apparent in Halo 4 (ok, look I don’t play that many online multiplayer games, but Halo is a big enough series that I think it makes for an adequate sample size). Since roughly 2010 I’ve noticed a decline in talking during multiplayer games.

Now, I’m not saying we should all immediately become best friends with everyone who we play Xbox Live with. But letting your teammates know that you’re going to attack or defend goes a long way. Me and the small group of friends who play Halo together are not, by any means, great at Halo (well Justin is, but he’s an anomaly). But because we’re talking we win far more matches than we lose.

And I think everyone can agree that it’s way more fun to win a multiplayer game than to lose.

If you’d like to play Titanfall with me my Gamer Tag is Ice Jedi. But please, wear a headset.

-Creighton

The birth of Xbox Live 

I finally got around to reading this article. Russ Pitts’ writing is fantastic.

I was there, on Xbox Live in the early days, and it was really like magic. If you have the time, read this great look back at the early days of Live.

TIL: you can’t have more than 36 months of Xbox Live Gold remaining on your account.
I just tried to redeem a 12 month Xbox Live code and got a weird billing error. After talking to support it turns out that you can’t have 36 months of Live remaining on your account. And if you try to redeem a Xbox Live prepaid card that pushes you past the 36 month timeframe it’ll lock you out.
Looks like I’m going to have to wait until May 8th to activate this code… I really hope I don’t lose it between now and then.

TIL: you can’t have more than 36 months of Xbox Live Gold remaining on your account.

I just tried to redeem a 12 month Xbox Live code and got a weird billing error. After talking to support it turns out that you can’t have 36 months of Live remaining on your account. And if you try to redeem a Xbox Live prepaid card that pushes you past the 36 month timeframe it’ll lock you out.

Looks like I’m going to have to wait until May 8th to activate this code… I really hope I don’t lose it between now and then.

Xbox Live turns 10 this week. As a nice gesture they sent long time Live subscribers an Xbox Avatar helmet. It is extremely ugly. But I will wear it for the rest of the week.

Man, just look at it. It’s horrible. If the point was to remind me how ugly the first Xbox was, mission accomplished.

Xbox Live Price Increasing

I’m not surprised by this. Actually, I’m more surprised it didn’t happen sooner.  The price of Xbox Live has been 50 dollars since it launched on the original Xbox.  I expected the price to rise after the the 360 was released.

While this is terrible, horrible news, for Xbox Live subscribers know this, Amazon is your friend. I haven’t paid full price for Xbox Live in years because I can always find cards at 10-15 dollars cheaper.  So while this does affect everyone, know that you can still save some money. Also, you can buy a year subscription now and lock in that current price.

-Creighton

[Major Nelson]

Taking 5: Xbox Live Anywhere

This week at Gamescom in Germany, Microsoft unveiled how Xbox Live is going to work with Windows Phone 7. It seems they are finally going to make good on the promise to deliver Xbox Live Anywhere… one they made during E3 2006.

Back in the dark days before the iPhone, Microsoft promised to deliver the ability to take your Xbox Live profile with you on your mobile device, see what your friends are doing, send messages, check gamerscore, and even “Start a game on Xbox, continue it on your phone.”  There was a walkthrough of Live Anywhere on Eurogamer… but the video has since been deleted.

Engadget has an article from May 2006 that says:

Halo isn’t going to run so well on your RAZR, so for actual cross platform titles, Microsoft is sticking with XBLA-esque games that can translate easily to different platform, such as Bejeweled. There will, however, be major games that can be played on your Vista PC and Xbox 360. Microsoft is banking heavily on third party support for Live Anywhere, in the form of mobile friendly value-adds for 360 games, and just straight up phone-friendly casual titles.

Where did that go?  And why doesn’t anyone bring it up anymore?  It was announced at E3 and was legitimate enough that Penny Arcade accurately mocked the service a few months later in 2006 with a comic, and a complimentary news post.

Read more

There are so many Avatar… whatevers… right now that I want.  It is taking every fiber of my restraint not to purchase digital clothing and toys for my Avatar.

Taking 5: You, Your Online You, and Microsoft

It started with a tweet from Xbox Live’s e.  He says “There’s no way to delete gamertags, period.”  I was struck by that sentence.  Xbox Live is the best online console service.  It’s features far outweigh it’s competitors (I know, I have all 3 systems) and the Xbox 360 has more parental controls than even I would know what to do with.  But there is no way to remove myself from the service? That can’t be right.  I called Microsoft and tested it.

I was on the phone for half an hour and spoke to 3 different operators.  They told me numerous times that they couldn’t delete my Gamertag but never said why. As someone who uses their service, and especially as someone that is paying for that service I expect the ability to remove myself whenever I want.

There was a huge debacle last year when Facebook changed its terms of service allowing them to retain your account information and use it as they deem fit even after you have terminated your profile.  After two days Facebook relented and now if you delete your account it’s gone forever.  That’s all I’m asking of Microsoft.  To allow me to delete my account.  

We live in the kind of world where something you do on the internet can affect a great portion of your life.  A world where if you apply for a job the first thing HR is going to do is a Google search and the second thing they’re going to do is try and find you on Facebook.  This should not be news for anyone, especially those of you reading this blog, but it is worth remembering.

Anything you put on the Internet you should be allowed to remove from the internet. With a few clicks I can forever remove my Vimeo videos, my Facebook account and Nerdology, the three pillars of my online identity, so I find it insane that there is no way to remove my Xbox account.  

If I decide to run for political office (however unlikely) do I want people to know that I have the grab bag achievement in Turok?  No.  Microsoft is constantly looking for ways to differentiate Gold and Silver memberships on Xbox Live, add “allows you to remove yourself from the service” to the list of Gold memberships along side “access to demo’s early” and “online multiplayer.”

As I said in my earlier post, I’m not doing this because I hate Xbox Live.  Quite the opposite. I want it to be the best service it can be and all I wan’t to do is point out the absurdities getting in the way.

Microsoft Won’t Allow You To Permanently Delete Your Gamertag

I’m making a big deal out of this because I love the Xbox service.  Because the Xbox 360 has more parental controls than even I would know what to do with.  And because I should be allowed to remove myself from a service that I am/was paying for.

The phone call lasted around 30 minutes.  The above video is 1/5 that length, so yes it is heavily edited, but only because nobody want’s to sit through 30 minutes of me talking to operators.

Original Xbox Live Deathwatch

And so it ends.  I just got home, I have no idea when it went down, but it’s all over.

Next page Something went wrong, try loading again? Loading more posts